LOV

LOV stands for Linked Open Vocabularies. This name is derived from LOD, standing for Linked Open Data. Let’s assume that the reader is somehow familiar with the latter concept, otherwise a visit to http://linkeddata.org/ or http://www.w3.org/2013/data/ will help to figure it before further reading.

Data on the Web use properties (aka predicates) and classes (aka types) to describe people, places, products, events, and any kind of things whatsoever. In the data “Mary is a person, her family name is Watson, she lives is the city of San Francisco”, “Person” is the class of Mary, “City” is the class of San Francisco, “family name” and “lives is” are properties used to describe a person, the latter acting also as a link between a person and a place.

A vocabulary in LOV gathers definitions of a set of classes and properties (together simply called terms of the vocabulary), useful to describe specific types of things, or things in a given domain or industry, or things at large but for a specific usage.

Terms of vocabularies also provide the links in linked data, in the above case between a Person and a City. The definitions of terms provided by the vocabularies bring clear semantics to descriptions and links, thanks to the formal language they use (some dialect of RDF such as RDFS or OWL). In short, vocabularies provide the semantic glue enabling Data to become meaningful Data.

https://lov.linkeddata.es/dataset/lov

COAR Controlled Vocabulary, “Resource Type”

COAR is pleased to announce the release of the Resource Type Vocabulary, Version 2. This vocabulary, which is now available in 15 languages, provides standardized terms for different types of content contained in a repository. Controlled vocabularies ensure that “everyone is using the same word to mean the same thing” and are key to achieving the COAR vision of a global knowledge commons, based on an interoperable, international network of open repositories. The Resource Type Vocabulary supports discovery of content by allowing readers to confidently search and browse across systems according to the “type” of content they are looking for.

The Resource Type Vocabulary is one of three vocabularies published to date by COAR. The other two are Access Rights Vocabulary and Version Type Vocabulary. All vocabularies are openly available in SKOS format (using SKOS eXtension for Labels) with concepts identified using URIs, supporting a hierarchical model with multilingual labels. For Resource Type Version 2.0, the Editorial Board has improved and expanded on the initial release of the vocabulary with new concepts and labels based on the community feedback. Mapping of the labels to other ontologies such as info:eu-repo, Bibo Ontology, DCMI, FaBiO Ontology, DataCite and CASRAI dictionary is available and has been updated. In addition, all three COAR Controlled Vocabularies are used in the OpenAIRE 4.0 Metadata Guidelines.

SOURCE: New release of the COAR Controlled Vocabulary, “Resource Type”