Loterre

Developed by the Inist-CNRS, Loterre (Linked open terminology resources) is a platform for multidisciplinary terminological scientific resources sharing, complying with the linked open data standards and the FAIR principles.

Loterre relies on an RDF triplestore and allows users to browse or query the resources via an API or a SPARQL endpoint, and to download them.

Loterre was designed in a spirit of openness and proposes its exposure services to other producers of terminological data.

https://www.loterre.fr

Generation R

Generation R is an online editorial platform for Open Science discourse across Europe.

Our guiding editorial question to approach Open Science is to take a ‘needs based approach’ to researchers and look for replicable models that the wider community can use, either on a conceptual level or in practical implementations.

This lead question makes up one part of our four lines of investigation:

  • taking a ‘needs based approach’ to researchers,
  • Open Science discourse,
  • improving the making of Open Science software & systems, and
  • addressing imbalances and problems in science knowledge systems.

The platform runs blog posts, as well an evolving and collaborative ‘Notebook’ format where we look to transfer our findings as learning resource to partner platforms, for example as content for: MOOCs, syllabi, guides, Software Carpentry resources, listings, or literature bibliographies.

We organize our postings by theme, but not exclusively. Themes can vary in time period that they will run for, but the standard time period will be six weeks. Using our Notebook we will pre-announce themes and look to collaboratively develop the ideas. Our launch theme is ‘Software Citation’ which will be followed by ‘The Decentralized Web’ in September, and by ‘Citizen Science’ for mid-October.

Generation R is brought to you by the Leibniz Research Alliance Open Science.

https://genr.eu/

COAR Controlled Vocabulary, “Resource Type”

COAR is pleased to announce the release of the Resource Type Vocabulary, Version 2. This vocabulary, which is now available in 15 languages, provides standardized terms for different types of content contained in a repository. Controlled vocabularies ensure that “everyone is using the same word to mean the same thing” and are key to achieving the COAR vision of a global knowledge commons, based on an interoperable, international network of open repositories. The Resource Type Vocabulary supports discovery of content by allowing readers to confidently search and browse across systems according to the “type” of content they are looking for.

The Resource Type Vocabulary is one of three vocabularies published to date by COAR. The other two are Access Rights Vocabulary and Version Type Vocabulary. All vocabularies are openly available in SKOS format (using SKOS eXtension for Labels) with concepts identified using URIs, supporting a hierarchical model with multilingual labels. For Resource Type Version 2.0, the Editorial Board has improved and expanded on the initial release of the vocabulary with new concepts and labels based on the community feedback. Mapping of the labels to other ontologies such as info:eu-repo, Bibo Ontology, DCMI, FaBiO Ontology, DataCite and CASRAI dictionary is available and has been updated. In addition, all three COAR Controlled Vocabularies are used in the OpenAIRE 4.0 Metadata Guidelines.

SOURCE: New release of the COAR Controlled Vocabulary, “Resource Type”

Net-Art; Remote online digital studio art course

Net-Art is a remote online digital studio art course intended to expose and expand the vocabulary of new media art to the student’s personal visual statements.

Students are expected to produce a related series of electronic art works with a concentration on experimentation and the transcendence of ideas.

Through various processes, both manual and technology based, students will be exposed to the use and application of electronic media via desktop and mobile art practice. Students may reference their work in conjunction with prior interests in drawing, painting, photography, sculpture, installation, video & performance art as well as any other inter-disciplinary subjects of interest.

The course will take place here on this URL using (OER) Open Education Resources, Public Domain and other Creative Commons Sources.

OER Commons

OER Commons offers a comprehensive infrastructure for curriculum experts and instructors at all levels to identify high-quality OER and collaborate around their adaptation, evaluation, and use to address the needs of teachers and learners. Diving into OER Commons is an exciting opportunity to collaborate with other educators and learners, at the forefront of a new educational era.

Open Educational Resources (OER) are teaching and learning materials that you may freely use and reuse at no cost, and without needing to ask permission. Unlike copyrighted resources, OER have been authored or created by an individual or organization that chooses to retain few, if any, ownership rights.

In some cases, that means you can download a resource and share it with colleagues and students. In other cases, you may be able to download a resource, edit it in some way, and then re-post it as a remixed work. How do you know your options? OER often have a Creative Commons license or other permission to let you know how the material may be used, reused, adapted, and shared.

From a single point of access in OER Commons, you can search, browse, and evaluate resources in OER Commons’ growing collection of over 50,000 high-quality OER. Here are some curated collections to start exploring.

https://www.oercommons.org

Graduate Center Digital Initiatives (GCDI)

Graduate Center Digital Initiatives (GCDI) builds and sustains an active community around the shared idea of a “Digital GC,” where scholars and technologists explore new modes of inquiry that thoughtfully integrate digital tools and methods into the research, teaching, and service missions of the institution.

Comprised of a constellation of centers and labs, initiatives, and academic programs and a tightly knit group of fellows, faculty, and staff, GCDI creates programming and resources that can benefit anyone at the Graduate Center. We offer events and workshops, drop-in office hours, faculty consultations, working groups, week-long institutes, Monday Maker Hours, and Python Users’ Group (PUG) meetings that are open to the entire community. Our websites offer valuable resources and updates about the many opportunities there are to be part of the #DigitalGC.

Our activities, and the activities of our institutional partners, take place in a variety of spaces, including labs and centers. Our newest addition, the GC Maker Space, is part of the GC Digital Scholarship Lab, and we are in the planning stages of a forthcoming CUNY Center for Digital Scholarship and Data Visualization funded by a CUNY 2020 grant.

A leader in digital humanities, GCDI creates research and projects –including the CUNY Academic Commons, Commons In A Box (CBOX), Social Paper, DH Box, Manifold Scholarship, Beyond Citation–that have been supported by public and private grants. Students in academic programs associated with GCDI enjoy the benefit of hands-on experience with long-standing digital humanities scholars and projects, such as the Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy.

https://gcdi.commons.gc.cuny.edu

Open Educational Resources – Open & Affordable Education Committee

Open and Affordable Education Committee launches new website.

The high cost of textbooks has become a major problem for many students. However, there is a group at Iowa State working against the cost barrier by advocating for the use of less costly course materials in the classroom.

The Open & Affordable Education Committee, a partnership between the University Library, CELT (Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching), ISU Book Store, the Senior Vice President and Provost, Student Government, and others, provides support for faculty interested in affordable course materials at Iowa State.

The committee can provide support to help faculty understand the options available to them to make their courses more affordable for students including access to course reserves and open educational resources (OER), among others.

One way the committee has worked to raise awareness about affordable course material options is by creating a website about OER: free, openly licensed educational materials that can be edited by instructors.

News, events, and information about the services available to faculty interested in OER and other affordable course materials available at Iowa State will be shared via this website oer iastate.

An important feature on the site is the OER Trailblazers Showcase, which highlights the work that select instructors at Iowa State University are doing to make their courses more affordable for students.

To learn more about Open Educational Resources at ISU, visit the new OER website or contact Abbey Elder, Open Access & Scholarly Communication Librarian.