Open Knowledge Foundation

Our mission – an open world, where all non-personal information is open, free for everyone to use, build on and share; and creators and innovators are fairly recognised and rewarded.

We live in a knowledge society where we face two different futures: one which is open and one which is closed.

An open future means knowledge is shared by all – freely available to everyone, a world where people are able to fulfil their potential and live happy and healthy lives. A closed future is one where knowledge is exclusively owned and controlled leading to greater inequality and a closed future.

Large unaccountable technology companies have monopolised the digital age, and an unsustainable concentration of wealth and power has led to stunted growth and lost opportunities. When that happens it is consumers, future innovators and society that loses out.

We live in powerful times, where the greatest danger is not the chaos but to rest in the past. So we recognise it is time for new rules for this new digital world.

With inequality rising, never before has our vision of a fair, free and open future been so important to realise our mission of an open world in complex times.

We want to be global leaders for the openness of all forms of knowledge to secure a fair, free and open future.

We want to create a more open world where all non-personal information is open, free for everyone to use, build on and share; and creators and innovators are fairly recognised and rewarded.

We understand that phrases like ‘open data’ and ‘open knowledge’ are not widely understood. It is our job to change that.

The next 15 years and beyond are not to be feared. We live in a time when technological advances offer incredible opportunities for us all.

This is a time to be hopeful about the future, and to inspire those who want to build a better society.

We will pursue this mission in the following ways:

  • People – Supporting people and organisations to create a free, fair and open future
  • Places – Extend our global reach into new geographies and industries, in particular, health, education and work
  • Policies – Having policies and procedures that support our vision and make us fit for purpose
  • Partnerships – Working in partnership with others who can help us achieve our vision, and secure funding partnerships that enable us to be sustainable

Through this work, we want to bring people on a journey from first learning about the concepts of openness and open knowledge to becoming open ambassadors helping us to change the world. We imagine this journey as a continuum where different stages will be relevant and appropriate for individuals or organisations as they develop their skills and interest in openness.

https://okfn.org

Educopia Institute

The Educopia Institute empowers collaborative communities to create, share, and preserve knowledge.

We believe in the power of connection and collaboration. In all of our work, we encourage knowledge sharing and network building across institutions, communities, and sectors. Our strengths include training, neutral community facilitation, and administrative backbone support services for collaborative communities. Educopia also develops and manages applied research projects that benefit our affiliated communities and the broader information fields of libraries, archives, and museums.

We help information stakeholders including researchers, archivists, curators, publishers, and students to establish common ground, work toward shared goals, and ultimately achieve system-wide transformations.

https://educopia.org/

DBpedia

DBpedia is a crowd-sourced community effort to extract structured content from the information created in various Wikimedia projects. This structured information resembles an open knowledge graph (OKG) which is available for everyone on the Web. A knowledge graph is a special kind of database which stores knowledge in a machine-readable form and provides a means for information to be collected, organised, shared, searched and utilised. Google uses a similar approach to create those knowledge cards during search. We hope that this work will make it easier for the huge amount of information in Wikimedia projects to be used in some new interesting ways.

DBpedia data is served as Linked Data, which is revolutionizing the way applications interact with the Web. One can navigate this Web of facts with standard Web browsers, automated crawlers or pose complex queries with SQL-like query languages (e.g. SPARQL). Have you thought of asking the Web about all cities with low criminality, warm weather and open jobs? That’s the kind of query we are talking about.

The DBpedia Knowledge Base

Knowledge bases are playing an increasingly important role in enhancing the intelligence of Web and enterprise search and in supporting information integration. Today, most knowledge bases cover only specific domains, are created by relatively small groups of knowledge engineers, and are very cost intensive to keep up-to-date as domains change. At the same time, Wikipedia has grown into one of the central knowledge sources of mankind, maintained by thousands of contributors.

The DBpedia project leverages this gigantic source of knowledge by extracting structured information from Wikipedia and by making this information accessible on the Web under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License and the GNU Free Documentation License.

https://wiki.dbpedia.org/

Wikidata

Wikidata is a free and open knowledge base that can be read and edited by both humans and machines.

Wikidata acts as central storage for the structured data of its Wikimedia sister projects including Wikipedia, Wikivoyage, Wiktionary, Wikisource, and others.

Wikidata also provides support to many other sites and services beyond just Wikimedia projects! The content of Wikidata is available under a free license, exported using standard formats, and can be interlinked to other open data sets on the linked data web.

https://www.wikidata.org

OER Knowledge Cloud

The OER Knowledge Cloud is being updated regularly by professional librarians and by volunteers.

The Cloud data, whether that be journal articles (i.e. papers in periodicals), reports (e.g. government, industrial), books or other items, is fully searchable. The items are freely extractable from the database and or linked to a relevant URL.

We are anticipating that Athabasca University Library will become a repository for all data that deals with Open Educational Resources and will be able to be the source of electronic copies of many references.

OER Repositories and Resources

https://oerknowledgecloud.org

Open Definition

The Open Definition sets out principles that define “openness” in relation to data and content.

It makes precise the meaning of “open” in the terms “open data” and “open content” and thereby ensures quality and encourages compatibility between different pools of open material.

https://opendefinition.org/