COPIM

COPIM (Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs) is an international partnership of researchers, universities, librarians, open access book publishers and infrastructure providers. It is building community-owned, open systems and infrastructures to enable open access book publishing to flourish.

Open access book publishing stands at a crossroads: one avenue leads to the monopolisation of open access by large commercial publishers and for-profit intermediaries, with infrastructures and funding systems set up to serve those businesses and their approaches; the other opens up a more diverse, scholar-led, community-owned, and not-for-profit publishing ecosystem that enables smaller and more community-focused presses to thrive and multiply.

https://www.copim.ac.uk/

Hyphenopoly

Hyphenopoly is a JavaScript library for providing robust hyphenation in HTML, especially while hyphenation remains patchily supported by web browsers, especially across multiple languages. Hyphenopoly provides hyphenation dictionaries and algorithms derived from Francis M Liang’s classic TeX hyphenation algorithm. Hyphenopoly can be dropped in to any website. Hyphenopoly supercedes an earlier JS system Hyphenator.

http://mnater.github.io/Hyphenopoly/

Scholars’ Lab

Scholars’ Lab is the UVA Library’s community lab for the practice of experimental scholarship in all disciplines, informed by digital humanities, spatial technologies, and cultural heritage approaches.

We offer mentoring, collaboration, and a safe and supportive community experience for anyone curious about learning to push disciplinary and methodological boundaries through new approaches. We’re foremost a space for learning together—about anything—by trying stuff. Think of us as friends and colleagues who can help you teach yourself new ways of approaching your interests.

We are an internationally recognized scholarly team, with strengths including:

  • the digital humanities (as a founding member of Centernet, an international network of digital humanities centers)
  • GIS, mapping, & other spatial technologies
  • cultural heritage informatics (including photogrammetry, scanning, and modeling of artifacts and historic architecture; and exploring virtual reality and augmented reality approaches to this data)
  • pedagogy, training, & mentorship in the digital humanities and spatial technologies, practiced with our ~60 formally supported students each year (plus additional, informal support of students via consultation & public programming)
  • research & development (e.g. programming and design)
  • makerspaces and making as scholarship
  • librarianship (e.g. expert consultation for experimental scholarly projects)

https://scholarslab.lib.virginia.edu

Kialo Edu

A unique tool for teaching critical thinking

Kialo Edu is a custom version of Kialo (kialo.com), the world’s largest argument mapping and debate site, specifically designed for classroom use. Its clear, visually compelling format makes it easy to follow the logical structure of a discussion and facilitates thoughtful collaboration. Kialo’s mission is to promote well-reasoned discussion online, and to that end, Kialo is free for educators to use.

https://www.kialo-edu.com/

Amnesia

Amnesia is a flexible data anonymization tool that transforms relational and transactional databases to dataset where formal privacy guaranties hold.

Amnesia implements data anonymization techniques from the field of Privacy Preserving Data Publishing (PPDP). The key idea in anonymization is that identifying information is removed from the published data, so no sensitive information can be attributed to a person. The anonymization procedure is not limited to the removal of direct identifiers that might exist in a dataset, e.g. the name or the Social Security Number of a person; it also includes removing secondary information, e.g. like age, zipcode that might lead indirectly to the true identity of an individual. This secondary information is referred to as quasi-identifiers. To better understand how secondary information can be used to re-identify a person, consider the following example. A publisher that owns medical data of patients wants to publish an anonymized version of the data she owns. The data are superficially anonymized by removing direct identifiers e.g., names and social security numbers, but descriptive information like the zip code of the patient’s residence and her/his age remain. An adversary who wants to identify the patients that are related to the anonymized data, may have access to such descriptive information from other sources, e.g., a voter’s registry. The re-identification can be achieved by matching the descriptive information (Zip code, Age) of the anonymized data to the public registry. If a single match is produced for a given combination, then a patient can be accurately identified. The sparser the data are, the more unique combinations exist, and the easier it is for an adversary to locate unique records that correspond to specific users.

https://amnesia.openaire.eu/

ZBW MediaTalk

ZBW Blog about Open Science, Information Infrastructures, Innovations and more.

Open science has fundamentally changed the research landscape. Scientific workflows are becoming more collaborative, more reproducible and more transparent, and there are also many new possibilities to make a scientific impact. The development is based on two points: While many researchers engage in open access and open research data practices in their daily work routines in a bottom-up movement, European research policies are also shaping the framework conditions in which open science can develop.

ZBW MediaTalk wants to accompany this transition. The blog is run by ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, which is the world’s largest research infrastructure for economic science literature. ZBW is actively involved in shaping the radical change in science and, its dedicated application-oriented research and scientific policy department bringing new momentum to development – be it in-house, in Germany or in Europe.

The blog retraces the path of transformation. With researched articles, guest commentaries, interviews, conference reports and analyses, we address the following topics, among others:

  • The rise of open access and the development of new licencing models
  • Changes in publishing behaviour and new forms of publication
  • Alternative metrics (‘Altmetrics’) and a reward systems for researchers
  • New approaches such as the open peer review of the traditional quality assurance procedure
  • Aspects relating to scientific policy such as the GO-FAIR initiative and European research policy
  • Research data infrastructures such as the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC)
  • Modern forms of science communication
  • The application of FAIR principles (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Re-usable) to research data
  • Transformations of research data management and open data repositories
  • New research methods and protocols
  • The development and implementation of Open Educational Resources (OER)
  • The use of new technologies, such as artificial intelligence and blockchain, in the scientific environment
  • News from the Leibniz Research Alliance Open Science

ZBW MediaTalk is being used as a networking platform for actors and interested parties from the areas of science, information infrastructures and scientific policy at the same time.

https://www.zbw-mediatalk.eu/