Overlay journal

An overlay journal or overlay ejournal is a type of open access academic journal, almost always an online electronic journal (ejournal), that does not produce its own content, but selects from texts that are already freely available online. While many overlay journals derive their content from preprint servers, others, such as the Lund Medical Faculty Monthly, contain mainly papers published by commercial publishers, but with links to self-archived preprint or postprints when possible.

The editors of an overlay journal locate suitable material from open access repositories and public domain sources, read it, and evaluate its worth. This evaluation may take the form of the judgement of a single editor or editors, or a full peer review process.

Public validation of subsequently approved texts may take several forms. At its most formal, the editor may republish the article with explicit approval. Approval might take the form of an addition to the text or its metadata. Or the editor may simply link to the article, via the table of contents of the overlay journal. An alternative approach is to link to articles already published in various open access ejournals, but adding value by grouping scattered articles together as a single themed issue of the overlay journal. Such themed issues allow the focussed coverage of relatively obscure or newly emerging topics.

Open Definition

The Open Definition sets out principles that define “openness” in relation to data and content.

It makes precise the meaning of “open” in the terms “open data” and “open content” and thereby ensures quality and encourages compatibility between different pools of open material.
It can be summed up in the statement that:

It can be summed up in the statement that:

“Open means anyone can freely access, use, modify, and share for any purpose (subject, at most, to requirements that preserve provenance and openness).”

Put most succinctly:

“Open data and content can be freely used, modified, and shared by anyone for any purpose

LOV

LOV stands for Linked Open Vocabularies. This name is derived from LOD, standing for Linked Open Data. Let’s assume that the reader is somehow familiar with the latter concept, otherwise a visit to http://linkeddata.org/ or http://www.w3.org/2013/data/ will help to figure it before further reading.

Data on the Web use properties (aka predicates) and classes (aka types) to describe people, places, products, events, and any kind of things whatsoever. In the data “Mary is a person, her family name is Watson, she lives is the city of San Francisco”, “Person” is the class of Mary, “City” is the class of San Francisco, “family name” and “lives is” are properties used to describe a person, the latter acting also as a link between a person and a place.

A vocabulary in LOV gathers definitions of a set of classes and properties (together simply called terms of the vocabulary), useful to describe specific types of things, or things in a given domain or industry, or things at large but for a specific usage.

Terms of vocabularies also provide the links in linked data, in the above case between a Person and a City. The definitions of terms provided by the vocabularies bring clear semantics to descriptions and links, thanks to the formal language they use (some dialect of RDF such as RDFS or OWL). In short, vocabularies provide the semantic glue enabling Data to become meaningful Data.

https://lov.linkeddata.es/dataset/lov

Open Pedagogy

Open pedagogy is the practice of engaging with students as creators of information rather than simply consumers of it. It’s a form of experiential learning in which students demonstrate understanding through the act of creation. The products of open pedagogy are student created and openly licensed so that they may live outside of the classroom in a way that has an impact on the greater community.

OA Monographs

Open Access Monographs

An open access monograph is a scholarly monograph which is made freely available with a creative commons licence.

Open Access monographs offer a real opportunity for long-form humanities and social sciences scholarship to reach a wider audience.

Markdown

Markdown is a text-to-HTML conversion tool for web writers. Markdown allows you to write using an easy-to-read, easy-to-write plain text format, then convert it to structurally valid XHTML (or HTML).

Journal level metrics

Journal level metrics – metrics that apply to all papers published within a journal. A common example is Thomson Reuters’ journal impact factor.

H-index

H-index – a personal metric that relates the number of citations to the number of published papers for an academic.