Generation R

Generation R is an online editorial platform for Open Science discourse across Europe.

Our guiding editorial question to approach Open Science is to take a ‘needs based approach’ to researchers and look for replicable models that the wider community can use, either on a conceptual level or in practical implementations.

This lead question makes up one part of our four lines of investigation:

  • taking a ‘needs based approach’ to researchers,
  • Open Science discourse,
  • improving the making of Open Science software & systems, and
  • addressing imbalances and problems in science knowledge systems.

The platform runs blog posts, as well an evolving and collaborative ‘Notebook’ format where we look to transfer our findings as learning resource to partner platforms, for example as content for: MOOCs, syllabi, guides, Software Carpentry resources, listings, or literature bibliographies.

We organize our postings by theme, but not exclusively. Themes can vary in time period that they will run for, but the standard time period will be six weeks. Using our Notebook we will pre-announce themes and look to collaboratively develop the ideas. Our launch theme is ‘Software Citation’ which will be followed by ‘The Decentralized Web’ in September, and by ‘Citizen Science’ for mid-October.

Generation R is brought to you by the Leibniz Research Alliance Open Science.

https://genr.eu/

Public Books Database

With university classrooms and libraries shuttered because of the COVID-19 crisis, scholars are facing disruptions not only in their teaching lives but also in their ability to access research materials. In response, many academic presses have made hundreds of their titles freely accessible online. The Public Books Database aims to catalog such resources in a single location and to highlight titles of particular interest. View the list (We’ll be updating regularly as additional materials are made available).

source: https://www.publicbooks.org/

Georgia Open Stacks

The University of Georgia Press is temporarily providing open, read-only access to a selection of our titles in history and other humanities fields. In response to the closures of school, libraries, and other public places due to COVID-19, our hope is provide material that will be of use to students as their classes are moved online or cancelled and to the general public as they self-isolate.

As you read the full texts of these works, you are able to communicate with the author and other readers on our Manifold site or through Twitter, joining existing threads or beginning new conversations. Some author-generated supplemental materials are provided to inform and supplement the teaching, learning, and reading experience. All rights-restricted images and/or text have been redacted.

https://ugapress.manifoldapp.org/

Access 1.4 Million Books for Free

“Students, teachers, and readers can now access over 1.4 million books for free as part of the National Emergency Library, a project launched on Tuesday by the Internet Archive to aid remote learning efforts.

Covid-19 has pushed millions of students’ classes online and temporarily shuttered public libraries. The Internet Archive, a nonprofit organization known for creating the Wayback Machine, has previously digitized more than one million books donated by educational institutions and libraries. The books in the National Emergency Library are titles from Open Library, another Internet Archive project, that have had their waitlists removed. Unlike a typical lending library, multiple users can access a single digital copy of a book at the same time….”

in You Can Now Access 1.4 Million Books for Free Thanks to the Internet Archive – VICE

Smithsonian Open Access

The Smithsonian Institution is inviting the world to engage with its vast repository of resources like never before.

For the first time in its 174-year history, the Smithsonian has released 2.8 million high-resolution two- and three-dimensional images from across its collections onto an open access online platform for patrons to peruse and download free of charge. Featuring data and material from all 19 Smithsonian museums, nine research centers, libraries, archives and the National Zoo, the new digital depot encourages the public to not just view its contents, but use, reuse and transform them into just about anything they choose—be it a postcard, a beer koozie or a pair of bootie shorts.

And this gargantuan data dump is just the beginning. Throughout the rest of 2020, the Smithsonian will be rolling out another 200,000 or so images, with more to come as the Institution continues to digitize its collection of 155 million items and counting.

https://www.si.edu/openaccess

Style guide for an Open Access publishing workflow for academic books

The present style guide has been created as result of the research project Open-Access-Hochschulverlag ( Open Access University Press) at Leipzig University of Applied Sciences, Germany.

The project was to develop a sustainable and adoptable workflow, which enables universities to publish their publications both as OA and printed books in a state-of-the-art publishing process and without any restrictions regarding the license, the variety of formats, print run etc.

The style guide was created to characterise the internal layout of OA books, which have been published by our university press. To enable low-threshold transfer of knowledge how to publish OA books, this style guide has been published under Creative Commons Licence CC BY.

Publishing monographs in a uniformly series design, the so house style, offers several advantages: it creates a recognition value for the user, so the publications are better remembered and the university press as a publisher becomes more visible as a brand. In addition, a uniform appearance ensures a consistent quality standard, as scientific publications can be highly structured and complex. Strict specifications facilitate the handling of those complex content and ensures the uniform appearance.

The house style of our project consist of general specifications such as the selection of book formats, the basic structure of the scientific publication, page layout, baseline grids, fonts, colors, pagination and running titles, as well as rules for hyphenation and Document Object Identifier (DOI). Furthermore, specifications for the content-specific elements, which may occur in scientific publication are defined, such as heading hierarchies, footnotes, subtitles, lists and numbering, indents, formulas, source code, info boxes, figures and tables. Finally, the guideline includes further specifications, e.g. cover design, directories, appendix and specifications for the electronic output formats of the publication.

Download (PDF): https://www.scienceopen.com/document?-1.ILinkListener-header-action~bar-read~button~so&vid=3bc68b3d-2242-4a08-a699-cf13a5024abb