Analysis of Open Source Publishing Tools and Platforms

Mind the Gap
A Landscape Analysis of Open Source Publishing Tools and Platforms

John W Maxwell, Erik Hanson, Leena Desai, Carmen Tiampo, Kim O’Donnell, Avvai Ketheeswaran, Melody Sun, Emma Walter, Ellen Michelle

Simon Fraser University / July 2019

The number of open source (OS) online publishing platforms, i.e. production and hosting systems for scholarly books and journals, launched or in development, has proliferated in the last decade. Many of these publishing infrastructure initiatives are well-developed, stable, and supported by a small but vigorous distributed community of developers, but promising new ventures have also recently launched.

The notable increase in the number of OS platforms suggest that an infrastructure ‘ecology’ is emerging around these systems. Distinguishing between systems that may evolve along competitive lines and those that will resolve into a service ‘stack’ of related, complementary service technologies will help potential adopters understand how these platforms can or should interoperate.

In 2018 the MIT Press secured a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon foundation to conduct a landscape analysis of open source publishing systems, suggest sustainability models that can be adopted to ensure that these systems fully support research communication and provide durable alternatives to complex and costly proprietary services. John Maxwell at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver conducted the environmental scan and compiled this report.

https://mindthegap.pubpub.org/

Credits: John W Maxwell, Erik Hanson, Leena Desai, Carmen Tiampo, Kim O’Donnell, Avvai Ketheeswaran, Melody Sun, Emma Walter, Ellen Michelle | Simon Fraser University / Jul2019

Open Access Books Toolkit

The OAPEN Foundation has launched a new open access (OA) books toolkit for researchers and academic book authors. The toolkit is a free-to-access, stakeholder-agnostic resource that aims to help authors better understand OA for books, increase trust in OA book publishing, provide reliable and easy-to-find answers to questions from authors, and to provide guidance on the process of publishing an OA book.

The toolkit was created in collaboration with Springer Nature and The University of Glasgow and has been written by a global group of stakeholders from the academic community and scholarly communications organisations. “Thanks to the efforts and help of nearly 70 individuals we have been able to create this public resource”. says Eelco Ferwerda, Director at OAPEN Foundation. “We hope this toolkit will prove useful to book authors and the OA books community around the world.”

This toolkit will help book authors to make their work OA, and enable more institutional support teams to identify the right information to help their researchers.

Access the toolkit www.oabooks-toolkit.org

Source: https://oapen.org/oapen/article/10705775-launch-of-the-oapen-open-access-books

Initiative for Open Abstracts

The Initiative for Open Abstracts (I4OA) is a collaboration between scholarly publishers, infrastructure organizations, librarians, researchers and other interested parties to advocate and promote the unrestricted availability of the abstracts of the world’s scholarly publications, particularly journal articles and book chapters, in trusted repositories where they are open and machine-accessible. I4OA calls on all scholarly publishers to open the abstracts of their published works, and where possible to submit them to Crossref.

https://i4oa.org/

A Humanist’s Cookbook for Natural Language Processing in Python

initial release of an open educational resource. – A Humanist’s Cookbook for Natural Language Processing in Python.

The project is presented as a series of notebooks, a series of Python 3 recipes for common problems and issues associated with preparing data for text analysis and natural language processing. The target audience is students—intermediate programmers who have begun to learn their way around Python but who need a little help pulling the pieces together to get something done.

The project has two main goals:

  • Present code blocks for common problems.
  • Contextualize those blocks with humanists in mind.

Brandon Walsh and Rebecca Draughon. “A Humanist’s Cookbook For Natural Language Processing In Python”. Published September 10, 2020. https://scholarslab.lib.virginia.edu/blog/a-humanists-cookbook-for-natural-language-processing-in-python/.

Open Publishing Fest

Open Publishing Fest celebrates communities developing open creative, scholarly, technological, and civic publishing projects. Together, we find new ground to share our ideas.

This is at once a collaborative and distributed event. Sessions are hosted by individuals and organizations around the world as panel discussions, fireside chats, demonstrations, and performances. We connect those points to bring them in conversation with one another and map out what’s next.

We seek to build networks of resilience and care for people working on new ways to develop and share knowledge.

Calendar: https://openpublishingfest.org/calendar.html

Generation R

Generation R is an online editorial platform for Open Science discourse across Europe.

Our guiding editorial question to approach Open Science is to take a ‘needs based approach’ to researchers and look for replicable models that the wider community can use, either on a conceptual level or in practical implementations.

This lead question makes up one part of our four lines of investigation:

  • taking a ‘needs based approach’ to researchers,
  • Open Science discourse,
  • improving the making of Open Science software & systems, and
  • addressing imbalances and problems in science knowledge systems.

The platform runs blog posts, as well an evolving and collaborative ‘Notebook’ format where we look to transfer our findings as learning resource to partner platforms, for example as content for: MOOCs, syllabi, guides, Software Carpentry resources, listings, or literature bibliographies.

We organize our postings by theme, but not exclusively. Themes can vary in time period that they will run for, but the standard time period will be six weeks. Using our Notebook we will pre-announce themes and look to collaboratively develop the ideas. Our launch theme is ‘Software Citation’ which will be followed by ‘The Decentralized Web’ in September, and by ‘Citizen Science’ for mid-October.

Generation R is brought to you by the Leibniz Research Alliance Open Science.

https://genr.eu/