A Humanist’s Cookbook for Natural Language Processing in Python

initial release of an open educational resource. – A Humanist’s Cookbook for Natural Language Processing in Python.

The project is presented as a series of notebooks, a series of Python 3 recipes for common problems and issues associated with preparing data for text analysis and natural language processing. The target audience is students—intermediate programmers who have begun to learn their way around Python but who need a little help pulling the pieces together to get something done.

The project has two main goals:

  • Present code blocks for common problems.
  • Contextualize those blocks with humanists in mind.

Brandon Walsh and Rebecca Draughon. “A Humanist’s Cookbook For Natural Language Processing In Python”. Published September 10, 2020. https://scholarslab.lib.virginia.edu/blog/a-humanists-cookbook-for-natural-language-processing-in-python/.

Open Publishing Fest

Open Publishing Fest celebrates communities developing open creative, scholarly, technological, and civic publishing projects. Together, we find new ground to share our ideas.

This is at once a collaborative and distributed event. Sessions are hosted by individuals and organizations around the world as panel discussions, fireside chats, demonstrations, and performances. We connect those points to bring them in conversation with one another and map out what’s next.

We seek to build networks of resilience and care for people working on new ways to develop and share knowledge.

Calendar: https://openpublishingfest.org/calendar.html

Generation R

Generation R is an online editorial platform for Open Science discourse across Europe.

Our guiding editorial question to approach Open Science is to take a ‘needs based approach’ to researchers and look for replicable models that the wider community can use, either on a conceptual level or in practical implementations.

This lead question makes up one part of our four lines of investigation:

  • taking a ‘needs based approach’ to researchers,
  • Open Science discourse,
  • improving the making of Open Science software & systems, and
  • addressing imbalances and problems in science knowledge systems.

The platform runs blog posts, as well an evolving and collaborative ‘Notebook’ format where we look to transfer our findings as learning resource to partner platforms, for example as content for: MOOCs, syllabi, guides, Software Carpentry resources, listings, or literature bibliographies.

We organize our postings by theme, but not exclusively. Themes can vary in time period that they will run for, but the standard time period will be six weeks. Using our Notebook we will pre-announce themes and look to collaboratively develop the ideas. Our launch theme is ‘Software Citation’ which will be followed by ‘The Decentralized Web’ in September, and by ‘Citizen Science’ for mid-October.

Generation R is brought to you by the Leibniz Research Alliance Open Science.

https://genr.eu/

Public Books Database

With university classrooms and libraries shuttered because of the COVID-19 crisis, scholars are facing disruptions not only in their teaching lives but also in their ability to access research materials. In response, many academic presses have made hundreds of their titles freely accessible online. The Public Books Database aims to catalog such resources in a single location and to highlight titles of particular interest. View the list (We’ll be updating regularly as additional materials are made available).

source: https://www.publicbooks.org/

Georgia Open Stacks

The University of Georgia Press is temporarily providing open, read-only access to a selection of our titles in history and other humanities fields. In response to the closures of school, libraries, and other public places due to COVID-19, our hope is provide material that will be of use to students as their classes are moved online or cancelled and to the general public as they self-isolate.

As you read the full texts of these works, you are able to communicate with the author and other readers on our Manifold site or through Twitter, joining existing threads or beginning new conversations. Some author-generated supplemental materials are provided to inform and supplement the teaching, learning, and reading experience. All rights-restricted images and/or text have been redacted.

https://ugapress.manifoldapp.org/

Access 1.4 Million Books for Free

“Students, teachers, and readers can now access over 1.4 million books for free as part of the National Emergency Library, a project launched on Tuesday by the Internet Archive to aid remote learning efforts.

Covid-19 has pushed millions of students’ classes online and temporarily shuttered public libraries. The Internet Archive, a nonprofit organization known for creating the Wayback Machine, has previously digitized more than one million books donated by educational institutions and libraries. The books in the National Emergency Library are titles from Open Library, another Internet Archive project, that have had their waitlists removed. Unlike a typical lending library, multiple users can access a single digital copy of a book at the same time….”

in You Can Now Access 1.4 Million Books for Free Thanks to the Internet Archive – VICE